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New Drivers Could Be Banned From Driving At Night
#1
News release from the RAC

A potential ban on newly-qualified motorists driving at night could have severe implications on the lives of young people, according to motoring experts.

In a recent report, the Department for Transport (DfT) announced it is considering plans to introduce a graduated licence scheme for new drivers.

But experts warn that the system – which would include a raft of new restrictions alongside a night-time ban – could put youngsters off driving entirely, severely limiting their independence. 

The move comes after recent DfT figures revealed one in five newly-qualified motorists are involved in a collision in their first 12 months.

To combat this, graduated driving licences could see new drivers prevented from taking passengers under a certain age, or have their legal alcohol limit reduced.

Similar schemes are already in place in other countries to improve the road safety of young drivers, including many EU countries and parts of Australia and Canada.

Click here to read the full article

Any views, folks?
bunny  We Live In A Rainbow Of Chaos, I'm Chasing The Carrot At The End Of The Tunnel bunny
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#2
The proposals would be very difficult to enforce especially with a Police service so depleted as it is today. I prefer a system that is virtually self enforcing. One such system exists in Japan. There new drivers have to be taught by approved driving schools and are then subject to a much more stringent driving test than ours is currently. BUT there is then another stage that all new drivers are subject to "PROBATION". They must carry the equivalent of a "P" plate on their car, are limited to a maximum of 50mph or 60 on motorways, may only carry one passenger, and if they have any accident or commit a moving traffic offence during their 1st year have to go back to stage one again and re sit the initial driving test, and start their probationary period again.

It seems to work!

TF
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#3
i think it would be to hard to police ,as a new driver could be any age , might be best to limit them to say a 1000cc car for the first year so they get some experience
In life ,always have a plan B Dodgy
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#4
Sadly 1,000 cc cars today are very potent! Just take a note of the number of small Vauxhall Corsa’s and Polo’s ( Usually black ones) that you see being driven at inappropriate speeds these days!
No, I fear that the emphasis must be placed on improved driver behaviour and the probationary period is probably the best way of doing that, - possibly allied to a compulsory “Black Box”

TF
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#5
TF I feel the Black box plus cameras and a rev limiter or speed limiter , or even a tachograph as in HGV. but not just cars motor bikes as well. Like you I have seen the results of speed when it all goes wrong.
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#6
While a probationary period for young drivers is an excellent idea which undoubtebly would save lives, I would not support it. The reason .. It's unenforceable !!! ... The criminal justice system is so bogged down with new politically correct" laws, that the police in particular have not enough time or resources to deal with the real crime which blights our society, far less those new " crimes " that are recent additions to the statute books.

[This post edited by Admin]
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#7
Bessie,
I would normally share your concern re enforceability, but having worked with it in two other countries I would say that it requires the very minimum of extra Police time. They do it go out looking for possible offenders but if the probationary driver commits an offence or has an accident their none compliance then becomes apparent and strong penalties follow. All I can say is that having worked with it, it works!

TF
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#8
TF Hence the need for a Black box plus camera, If there was any wrong doing the evidence is there, needs very little time to collect, works with HGV'S.
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#9
(02-08-2019, 03:52 PM)Tigerfish Wrote: Bessie,
I would normally share your concern re enforceability, but having worked with it  in two other countries I would say that it requires the very minimum of extra Police time. They do it go out looking for possible offenders but if the probationary driver commits an offence or has an accident their none compliance then becomes apparent and strong penalties follow.  All I can say is that having worked with it, it works!

TF

Obviously if a new probationary driver has a serious accident at night, it is a simple procedure to take action against that offender. But, the proposal is for ALL probationary drivers to be banned from driving during the hours of darkness. That is something that just cannot be enforced across the country and therefore would be a bad law. ... Hence I cannot support the proposal.
A dog is for life . Not just for Christmas
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